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Raymond Vogelsberg

September 8, 1958 — July 4, 2020

Raymond Edward Vogelsberg, 61, died in Hospice care at the Frankfort Community Care Home on the 4th of July, 2020. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, July 9, at Kinsley Mortuary, Marysville. A rosary service will be at 7 p.m. Thursday evening at St. Malachy’s Church, Beattie, KS. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10:30 a.m., Friday, July 10, at St. Malachy’s. Father Jim Shaughnessy will officiate, assisted by Rev. Marilyn Wullschleger Sweet. Lectors will be Sharon Vogelsberg and Libbie Vogelsberg. Gift bearers will be Caryl Ann Schell, Nancy Vogelsberg-Busch and Barbara Lutjemeier. Musicians will be Laura O’Neil, organist and Jody Ketter, vocalist. Pallbearers will be nephews Jason Schell, J.J., Matthew and Patrick Vogelsberg, Noah and Isaac Busch, Caleb Vogelsberg and Jacob Lutjemeier. Burial in St. Patrick’s Cemetery, Beattie. The family requests that all attendees wear masks and social distancing be maintained. Raymond would not want anyone to suffer or die from COVID-19 as a result of exposure at his services. Masks will be available at the church. For those who cannot attend, the funeral will be live-streamed on the Kinsley Mortuary Facebook page. Raymond was born on September 8, 1958 in Marysville, KS to John R. Vogelsberg and Loretta Jean (Goin) Vogelsberg. He was named after his Dad’s good friend and cousin, Raymond Rombeck and his Uncle Edward Haug husband of Mary (Sis) Vogelsberg Haug. Raymond was raised on the family farm homesteaded by his great-grandparents, Nicholas and Marie Anna (Rombeck) Vogelsberg, south of Home City. He had a carefree and happy childhood. He attended the two-room school house at Winifred. Raymond struggled learning to read in the second grade and later in life, was diagnosed with dyslexia. He repeated second grade at St. Gregory’s School in Marysville under the guidance of a loving and kind teacher. There Raymond learned to read and developed his deep faith in God. Raymond had a love of dogs, gardening and enjoyed raising ducks and chickens. His early farm chores helped him become an entrepreneur. While in high school, he sold eggs and was able to save money to buy a new long-bed Toyota truck. At Marysville High School, Raymond completed his high school courses at the end of the first semester of his senior year, but returned for graduation ceremonies in May, 1977, sporting a full beard at a time when facial hair was not allowed in school and most of his male classmates could only muster peach fuzz. Raymond was allowed to walk across the stage to receive his diploma. Raymond liked to have fun and turned many varieties of fruit into home-made wines which he shared with his friends along with medicinal herbs. These addictive substances would later take a toll on Raymond’s health. He found solace at AA and NA meetings and in sobriety. Raymond was clinically diagnosed bipolar. His mental illness was a struggle for him, his family and friends. Raymond would give everyone a wild ride with his manic mood swings. He always managed to even out by eventually checking himself willingly into a psych-ward. He would come back to his home and continue on with his free spirited lifestyle. Early work habits continued throughout Raymond's life and he established his Pro-Painting business. He was proud of his work on the Koester House Museum and that his business provided jobs for local youth. In Wamego, Raymond ran an antique store and later, sold and gave away many of his treasures out of his garage in Home City. He also worked for Kinsley Mortuary, where he took pride in wearing a suit and taking care of people even after they died. He appreciated local history and was a good story teller. He loved visiting with folks. Raymond had a special connection to the Life Cemetery, southwest of Beattie, where many generations of his mother’s paternal family are buried. He believed in truth and justice and once fought to prevent the moving of a Civil War soldier’s grave. Thus, a memorial stone honoring Raymond will be placed in Life Cemetery. In 1987, Archbishop Ignatius J. Strecker approved Raymond to serve for one year as a Rural Kansas Volunteer, a lay program under Director Fr. John Stitz. Raymond worked with Fr. Jim Shaughnessy at Annunciation Parish, Frankfort. Education and knowledge were valued by Raymond. In 1992, he received a Bachelor of Science degree from St. Mary College in Leavenworth, KS. His diploma was proudly displayed in his room at the care home. His Catholic faith led him to further studies at a seminary, but scandals within the Church led him to lead a layman’s life of faith. Raymond’s sense of adventure led to many road trips throughout the United States and a stay in San Francisco until his calling to be of service brought him back to Kansas to help raise his niece and nephew when their mother died. Raymond still had places he wanted to travel. He wanted to visit Rome and hoped to see the Pope. But his health declined and for the past four years, he lived at the Frankfort Community Care Home. Raymond did not like leaving his house in Home City and giving up his independence. But he felt, perhaps, it was his mission to live among his elders. He enjoyed visiting with them and listening to their stories. The care and kindness provided by the staff was greatly appreciated by Raymond. Raymond used the telephone to keep in touch with those he loved on a daily basis. The last four months of his life was spent in lockdown due to COVID-19. Raymond longed to see his family and to go for a ride in the country. Raymond’s life on earth was not easy. His family believes his path to Heaven was a joyous trip and he watches over those he loved. Even though Raymond won’t be calling us on the phone, his presence will be felt in our hearts as “Death ends a life, not a relationship.” Raymond is survived by his five siblings, Caryl (John) Schell, Centralia, R.J. (Sharon) Vogelsberg, Marysville, Nancy Vogelsberg-Busch, Home, Joe Vogelsberg, Home, and Barbara Lutjemeier (Joe Hodson), Manhattan; eight nephews, Jason Schell, J.J., Matthew and Patrick Vogelsberg, Noah and Isaac Busch, Caleb Vogelsberg and Jacob Lutjemeier; five nieces, Dannielle Heideman, Sara Kroeger, Ali Busch, Libbie Vogelsberg and Jessica Wilson; fifteen great-nephews and 8 great-nieces; many cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, grandparents John and Frieda (Wullschleger) Vogelsberg, and Walter Goin and Viola (Anderson) Goin Dean; his sister-in-law Jessie Hurlburt Vogelsberg and great-niece Ellie Grace Busch. Raymond’s meager savings will be given to St. Gregory’s school to help children in a loving educational environment which he cherished. Raymond’s memory may be honored by memorials to St. Gregory’s School in his name. Contributions may be sent in care of Kinsley Mortuary, Marysville. Funeral of Raymond Vogelsberg To order memorial trees or send flowers to the family in memory of Raymond Vogelsberg, please visit our flower store.

Service Schedule

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Visitation

Thursday, July 9, 2020

10:00am - 5:00 pm

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Rosary Service

Thursday, July 9, 2020

Starts at 7:00 pm

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St. Malachy Catholic Church

311 Williams St
Beattie, KS 66406

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Funeral Service

Friday, July 10, 2020

Starts at 10:30 am

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St. Malachy Catholic Church

311 Williams St
Beattie, KS 66406

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